Tools of the Trade - What folks are using for builds and maintenance

Discussion in 'CineStar FAQ - Tips and Tricks' started by Gary Haynes, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    It was on Low....technically speaking torque is not a product of speed, so "it shouldn't matter." That said, I've stripped enough bolts, screws etc. in my time, that I prefer to use Low speed just for mechanical sympathy -- and Low speed is still a whole lot faster than "manual high speed with a ratchet am I done yet" speed. :)

    Andy.
     
  2. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    I use low as the High didn't seem to have enough torque.
     
  3. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    I like that term. I may steal it. Actually I just did. ;)
     
  4. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    It goes quite nicely with the phrase "distinctly suboptimal." You can steal that too. :)

    Andy.
     
  5. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    I found yet another use for my PVC pipe frame today. I realized I can use it as a stand for my "ground station" [sic]. I have a bunch of crap in one of my Pelican cases, and I stuck some velcro on the outside to hold my video receiver, and I realized today that it fits nicely on top of the frame.
    00011 00031916.jpg
     
  6. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    You're much shorter in the image than in real life, Steve.
    Do you have to kneel in front of that ground station? ;)

    Andy.
     
  7. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Was looking for a better way to get a grip on the Dean's connectors that I use for powering my FPV setup. Similar question if you were using them on the gimbal. They are small and slippery and it is easy to pull on the wires rather than the connector. I ran across these when I was looking for some replacement Dean's. They are like small rubber bands and work very well. One on each Dean and make gripping much better. I got these at AlleRC.com.

    IMG_0970.JPG
     
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  8. Joshua Barker

    Joshua Barker New Member

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    Nice solution. The plug I prefer which is easier to plug in and out, solder, and has a higher amp draw capability is the Traxxas High Current Connectors.

    http://www.maxamps.com/Traxxas-Female.htm

    http://www.maxamps.com/Traxxas-Male.htm

    We have used deans for years but when Traxxas released this plug I switched over and have not been disappointed. Much bigger surface area and plastic ridges are nice for easy pull apart. Also soldering is a piece of cake because you are just soldering to the pins then putting them into the plug. No melted plastic.
     
  9. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Joshua for high loads like the power to the motors through a powerboard a lot of folks are using EC5 connectors. They seem to have become a standard in the CS world and are what you see installed on the the new Freefly Motor Control set and batteries. I use the Deans only for low stuff like the FPV just to keep out dirty signals from the motors. Deans are a bit small and lighter.
     
  10. MIke Magee

    MIke Magee Active Member

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    Compass Calibration on the field. I remember someone posting about using some rollers from sliding doors on top if a set of light stands. I went back to find the post but couldn't locate it. Thanks to whoever did that for pointing me in the right direction. Here's the solution we came up with.

    We use Stroboframe QR's on all our gear, and use one to mount the Pelican monitoring case that the camop uses.
    I got 2 cheap casters at Home Depot (~$3 each) and used some leftover arctic silver to mount them to a plate.
    CompCaltable.jpg

    Now, using the same tripod base that we always carry, we can calibrate the compass with two or even one person easily in the field.

    Pardon the blurry shot. But it works very well to roll the Cinestar for calibration.
    CompCalTripod.jpg


    Thanks to whoever presented the original roller idea, and others that commented. I didn't really steal your idea - As my old computer science prof used to say - " copying from one person is plagiarism, however copying from several is research.
     
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  11. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    MIke Magee likes this.
  12. Gary Kaplan

    Gary Kaplan New Member

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    The best tool you can invest in is a one that will let you understand the RF climate of your flying site. Know what waters you are jumping into before putting your expensive heli and camera in the air...

    (WiFi)
    80211 Scan Example.png
    (GSM Cell Phone)
    GSM Scan Example.png
    (LTE-4G Cell Phone)
    LTE 4G Scan Example.png
    (5.8GHz nothing Tx'ing at 5.8, but something strange at 5.4GHZ)
    58GHz Scan Example.png
    Gary
     
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  13. Kristian C

    Kristian C Member

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    Ben,

    I haven't used the Hitachi for my prop nuts yet, but for everything else, such as the screws to attach the gimbal, I use 'high-6.' I've compared tightening the screws by hand with the clutch settings on the Hitachi, and that's how I came up with '6.' Don't know if this helps at all. Just puttin it out there.

    - Kristian
     
  14. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    I don't believe that the high-low speed alters anything but the rotation. The slipping clutch is just controlled by the torque setting....
    So 6 is 6 regardless of whether you're on high speed or low speed -- all that changes is how long it takes you to get there. :)

    Andy.
     
  15. Nick Adams

    Nick Adams Member

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  16. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    I have read on a couple of other forums of folks using a small butane torch to aid in soldering. I’m struggling with the high gauge wire (8 and 10 gauge) to get clean connections, such as EC5 and motor bullets. It looks like a butane torch might be better at heating both the wire and the connector.

    Has anybody tried this?
     
  17. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Steve what are you using for a soldering station? My Hako FX-951 with a larger tip (T15-D2) at 850F does a good job. Same unit used by QC.
     
  18. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    I have the Hakko, too. I’ve been using a very fine tip, but maybe I’ll go back to the wider tip. And I’m at 800, but I’ll put in a few more dilithium crystals and see if I can push ‘er to 850°F. :eek:
     
  19. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    The torches are *really* hot and approach the "weapon of mass destruction" stage -- very hard to control the "over-spray" from the flame. A soldering iron with a heavier tip will help -- the Hakko fine tip is way too small because it lacks the thermal mass.

    On the other hand there's nothing wrong, for the heavier gauge work, to use something like this: http://www.amazon.com/D550PK-120-volt-200-watt-Professional-Soldering/dp/B00002N7S1

    Just be sure to set it for medium rare....


    EDIT: Oh, and it has the advantage that you wanneed to buy another tool. :rolleyes:
    Andy.
     
  20. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    Thanks for the advice, Andy. I’ll cool my jets for now.
     

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