How to export and view log file from MX-20

Discussion in 'CineStar FAQ - Tips and Tricks' started by Tyler Olson, May 10, 2013.

  1. Tyler Olson

    Tyler Olson Member

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    Ultra newb question here...

    I managed to get the MX-20 to create a log file, thanks to this thread
    Now that I have the file, what do I do with it? I did download the software SD_Log_Converter_Ver1.1.exe and that opened the file but the output doesn't look as nice as what people post in the forums. Do they build the data by hand from that software or is there something to output a 'summary' of the flight with max-min values etc?
     
  2. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    The data you see in most of the posts is from the MK log files. For the MX20 it is different. I use the Studio software, same software that you use to do upgrades to the MX-20 and receivers. There is a choice to view the log files on the left side. Depending on the types of data that are being send down through the RX determines what you can see. If you load the file and then play the file you will see a number of windows that show what is going on.
     
  3. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    The MK log files that Gary refers to are called GPX files and are created by the Mikrokopter Navigation Control Board. You insert a 2GB microSD card into the Navi Control board and it records flight data. You can then analyze this data using one of several GPX analysis programs. One of the better ones is MK_GPXTOOL (http://www.mikrokopter.de/ucwiki/en/MKGPXTool).

    Andy.
     
  4. Tyler Olson

    Tyler Olson Member

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    Thanks. Yeah, that was what I was looking for Andy. I thought it was received with the microSD slot in the MX-20 but I guess the Navi board is what I was looking for. I'll put the card back in there (I only have one right now)
     
  5. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Make sure the microSD card is formatted FAT16, though otherwise it will not record log files.

    Andy.
     
  6. Tyler Olson

    Tyler Olson Member

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    Ok.. I think I figured out how to record and show the flight finally...

    A short flight without any gimbal underneath.

    Flight date: 2013-05-12 20:50:43
    Flight time: 20:50:43 - 20:55:10 (267 secs, 00:04:27)
    Batt. time : 268 secs, 00:04:28

    Elevation(GPS) : 0 7.59 30.086 m (min/avg/max)
    Altitude(Barom.): 1.1 10.8 35.75 m
    Vertical speed : -1.66 -0.03 1.85 m/s
    Max speed : 13.3 km/h
    Max target dist.: 0 m

    Sats : 7 8 9

    Voltage : min. 19.2, max. 20.5 V
    Current : 5.7 44 75.7 A
    Wattage : 116 888 1483.72 W
    Capacity: 3334 mAh

    Motor1: 0.3 4.7 6.7 A Temp: 9 23 34 °C
    Motor2: 0.0 6.1 10.0 A Temp: 6 24 39 °C
    Motor3: 0.4 5.3 7.2 A Temp: 10 26 40 °C
    Motor4: 0.0 6.1 11.7 A Temp: 8 27 41 °C
    Motor5: 0.4 5.2 10.6 A Temp: 11 28 40 °C
    Motor6: 0.2 6.2 12.4 A Temp: 10 28 39 °C
    Motor7: 0.0 3.4 9.0 A Temp: 8 23 33 °C
    Motor8: 0.4 5.1 9.3 A Temp: 9 23 33 °C

    Magnet Field: 106 111 117 % (ok)
    Magnet Inclination: 69 71 77 deg

    No errors found ;)
     
  7. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Hi Tyler:
    You'll note that the even numbered motors are all pulling slightly more current that the odd numbered -- that suggests that one or more of the motors might not be completely vertical and the FC board is having to fight the resulting yawing motion.

    Check that all the motors are indeed vertical with respect to the posts holding up the battery plate (close one eye, look at the side of the motor casing from about two feet away and verify that the side of the motor casing is parallel to the battery post -- you may have to move your head left/right a bit two bring the side of the motor casing almost into overlap with the post). This is a "quick and dirty" method of checking motor alignment that I use.

    The idea behind the leveling procedure I described is that all of the motors' thrust lines (the line that ideal runs down the centre of the prop shaft) should be pointing vertical when the battery plate is horizontal. Of course, if you're out in the field then the odds are that the battery plate will not actually be horizontal -- which is why I use the visual approach I describe -- you at least get the motors at 90 degrees (aka "normal") to the battery plate by using the battery plate posts as a visual guide.

    The other thing I'll also do is hover the Cinestar about six feet away from me, and bring it to eye-line, so I'm looking at the disks formed by the rotating props absolutely edge on -- you can easily see if one or more prop disks are out of alignment as the disk for a misaligned motor is canted over.

    Hope this helps.
    Andy.
     

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