UAV Registration???

Discussion in 'Flight Regulations' started by Andy Post, Dec 15, 2015.

  1. Andy Post

    Andy Post Member

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    Hey Thrill Seekers,
    Please forgive me if I'm the dim bulb that doesn't get the story line here but.....

    We know that the FAA announced yesterday that all UAV's need to be registered. The caveat is that the online registration is only for hobby fliers. Commercial UAV's "Must continue to register through the paper process"; but I haven't found the "paper process" anywhere.

    Is that a reference to the 333 exemption?

    Is there some way to "register" with the FAA and hold tight while they move toward the more rational 107 rules?

    Now I did identify myself as the dim wit, so please....be gentle.
     
  2. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Commercial needs a 333 or COA. Non commercial uses the online system, one registration for all of your non commercial flying machines.
     
  3. Andy Post

    Andy Post Member

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    Can we get a COA without going all the way to the 333 exemption, or perhaps on the way to the exemption?
     
  4. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    The paper process is on the FAA UAS integration site. Its a pretty straight forward step by step process. You either have to write the FAA with the address they provide to get the form 8050-1 or go to your closest flight standards district office (FSDO). Then you have to send a bill of sale or receipt of purchase with proof of ownership. You either need to reserve an N number or they will assign you one. To reserve an N number it is 10 dollars per number. The FAA link is below. It is a bit hidden on the site.

    https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/aircraft_certification/aircraft_registry/UA/#SmallUA
     
  5. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    In theory the answer is yes but in reality it is no.

    The 333 is what you need to get the COA. Once you get the 333 you get a blanket COA with tighter restrictions such as how far you can fly near specific aerodromes. 5 for towered, 3 for non-towered with IAP's and 2 for non-towered without an IAP.

    If you have to fly outside the boundaries of the blanket COA you need to get a specific COA. All of this goes through the same office that issues the 333 AFS-80
     
  6. Andy Post

    Andy Post Member

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    sounds like the hobby registration might be the stick they are using to drive commercial operations through the 333 process. The Flight School Full Employment Act of 2015
     
  7. Andy Post

    Andy Post Member

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    Sorry. Thank you Shaun. I appreciate the link and the feedback from someone who has taken the time and expense to go through the process.

    I actually flew when I was a kid and would love to fly again. Thinking Sailplanes, I always wanted to do that. It's just such a nonsensical requirement and expense. Particularly when I'm the cinematographer and my son is the pilot, so HE would have to get the license...and he hates to fly commercially. Little chance of getting him to go up in a small craft.

    Thanks again. I'll see what I can do.
     
  8. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    No problem. Yeah it can be a nonsensical process for sure. Its better than what we had a few years ago at least. Sailplanes are where I got my start in aviation 23 years ago when I was 15. Got my first private cert in them at 17. I just got requalled this summer in a Blanik L-23. I actually enjoy glider flying then any other planes I have flown.

    A route your son can take is to get a sport balloon ticket. Its 7 hours and no solo requirement. Just a thought.
     
  9. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    That's interesting, Shaun. But an article I read said that, "Not only is pilot's license required to fly a commercial drone, but the license must be kept current, meaning pilots must fly a minimum of three flights every 90 days." Is that true?
     
  10. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    It is certainly true. You have to keep you're pilot's license current. I'm not sure what that means in terms of a sport balloon ticket though.

    Glad to hear you're back into some high performance aircraft Shaun. I used to own and fly a self-launching Glaser-Dirks DG-400, 17m span, 1:55 glide angle. Nice aircraft but stealthy -- disappears from radar when you stop to thermal.

    Andy.
     
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  11. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Steve can you site the source of your recency comment? Not sure that it applies. Absolutely applies for airplanes/helicopters/balloons. But the currency is only required when carrying passengers, leaving aside IFR requirements and the like. FAR 61.57

    But the couple of 333's I checked do require a bi-annual flight review. So every 24 months you would need to fly for 1 hour and take 1 hour of ground instruction from an instructor who then 'signs' you off. FAR 61.56 is typically cited in the issued 333 exemption.
     
  12. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Here's the typical language you'll see in a Section 333 Exemption grant: "The PIC must possess at least a private pilot certificate and at least a third-class airman medical certificate. The PIC must also meet the flight review requirements specified in 14 CFR § 61.56 in an aircraft in which the PIC is rated on his or her pilot certificate."

    Here's the language of 14 CFR 61.56 (with appropriate emphasis added for the preamble of (c)):

    Sec. 61.56 — Flight review.

    (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (f) of this section, a flight review consists of a minimum of 1 hour of flight training and 1 hour of ground training. The review must include:
    (1) A review of the current general operating and flight rules of part 91 of this chapter; and

    (2) A review of those maneuvers and procedures that, at the discretion of the person giving the review, are necessary for the pilot to demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of the pilot certificate.

    (b) Glider pilots may substitute a minimum of three instructional flights in a glider, each of which includes a flight to traffic pattern altitude, in lieu of the 1 hour of flight training required in paragraph (a) of this section.

    (c) Except as provided in paragraphs (d), (e), and (g) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 24th calendar month before the month in which that pilot acts as pilot in command, that person has—

    (1) Accomplished a flight review given in an aircraft for which that pilot is rated by an authorized instructor and

    (2) A logbook endorsed from an authorized instructor who gave the review certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed the review.

    (d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

    (e) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily accomplished one or more phases of an FAA-sponsored pilot proficiency award program need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

    (f) A person who holds a flight instructor certificate and who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily completed a renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions in §61.197 need not accomplish the one hour of ground training specified in paragraph (a) of this section.

    (g) A student pilot need not accomplish the flight review required by this section provided the student pilot is undergoing training for a certificate and has a current solo flight endorsement as required under §61.87 of this part.

    (h) The requirements of this section may be accomplished in combination with the requirements of §61.57 and other applicable recent experience requirements at the discretion of the authorized instructor conducting the flight review.

    (i) A flight simulator or flight training device may be used to meet the flight review requirements of this section subject to the following conditions:

    (1) The flight simulator or flight training device must be used in accordance with an approved course conducted by a training center certificated under part 142 of this chapter.

    (2) Unless the flight review is undertaken in a flight simulator that is approved for landings, the applicant must meet the takeoff and landing requirements of §61.57(a) or §61.57(b) of this part.

    (3) The flight simulator or flight training device used must represent an aircraft or set of aircraft for which the pilot is rated.

    [Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997; Amdt. 61–103, 62 FR 40898, July 30, 1997; Amdt. 61–104, 63 FR 20287, Apr. 23, 1998; Amdt. 61–124, 74 FR 42550, Aug. 21, 2009]
     
  13. Andy Post

    Andy Post Member

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    Sport Balloon n no solo. I might be able to make that sound like fun rather than forcing a fearful flyer to tempt fate....
     
  14. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    Yeah I know you flew some cool shit. The Blanik was an interesting beast. It does not like to land as well as the Grobs. I used to fly the 103's and 102's many years ago, I used to grease those in. The blanik just sort of stays in ground effect and plops. It was a joy though to put the thing in a 120 degree bank and pull and get the G rush again. A sensation of getting a 4.5 pull was fun as hell. Lately when I am not droning I am flying dudes around in Beechjets and G2's. Being on autopilot until 500 feet is not that fun! I am probably an oddball because I am probably one of the few people with 3000 hours of jet time with no CFI rating. But I plan on changing that this spring. My goal is to get CFI SEI, MEI CFII and CFIG in my future ;)
     

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