Out with the old in with the new?

Discussion in 'Cinestar Misc' started by hugo burns, Jul 11, 2015.

  1. hugo burns

    hugo burns Member

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    Hey everyone,

    With the new alta being released soon does this mean the end of the canister line?Will parts still be available?
    I certainly hope it isn't the end of these versatile copters!

    Hugo
     
  2. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    Hi Hugo!
    The Cinestar is really mostly a carbon fiber frame, and vendors like Quadrocopter fit them with motors and electronics and sell them. Or people buy the bits and do it themselves.
    I don't know if Freefly will continue to produce the frames, but if they don't, there are clone makers who make what I call the Sinostar frames that are compatible with things like flight controls, motors and gimbals.
    We'll have to see over time whether the DIY (do it yourself) and Value Added folks out there keep this standard frame type viable.
    Free market economics at work! :rolleyes:
     
  3. hugo burns

    hugo burns Member

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    Hey steve!

    Im part of that group who likes to go the diy route:) I have a feeling rtf rigs will take over in the future though!

    Loved your recent build of your x8 btw! Hopefully my little cs8 will grow up to be like that one day!

    Hugo
     
  4. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

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    Thank you. I definitely enjoy building, too. But I decided that for real work I need something more reliable and, quite frankly, better looking and more professional than my custom rigs. Film production companies (among others) are developing a knowledge of this space and an affinity towards the Freefly brand.
     
  5. Howard Dapp

    Howard Dapp Active Member

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    Really? Ultimately it boils down to what cameras you're able to fly, your reel and client base. Film production companies could give a hoot about what machine you're flying and how it looks. It seems the newbies are more concerned with buying the latest and so-called greatest equipment than they are in being creative and producing great visuals.
     
  6. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    I suppose with the Sinostar and a firm in China, it almost makes sense for FF to discontinue it. I do like its module structure, sorta like an octo with carbon fiber legos.
     
  7. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    I have to agree. The serious productions always want at least 4K raw. RED preferably with exception sometimes I can convince them to take the Black Magic 4K (I fly more comfortably with the BMCC4K in that it is less expensive crash, not that I plan on crashing.) Although its not a real weight saver. For all Netflix productions it has to be real 4K and not UHD. Every time I think I have what the production wants they want more, bigger, faster stronger. That's where it helps not to be handcuffed to an out of the box solution.
     

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