Gallop Effect

Discussion in 'MōVI M5' started by Paul Hill, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Paul Hill

    Paul Hill New Member

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    Apart from doing the silly walk, does anyone know how to reduce the gallop effect when using the Movi, either during filming or in post?

    Thanks

    Paul
     
  2. Nicolas Teeuwen

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    I am not totally sure what you mean by the gallop effect? Are you referring to the slight up and down bob it can get when moving?

    I have walked, ran and generally done a lot of movement with the Movi and rarely had any issues with that. I might be a bit biased though in that I used to use a Steadi-cam like device for stabilization.

    One other thing I would suggest is the weight. I generally have my entire rig weighing in at nearly 10 pounds when you add up the monitor, USB follow focus + Camera and Movi. Its still only 5 pound payload. I know that more weight actually helps improve the stabilization when I was shooting with Stead-cam device so perhaps its also helping here.
     
  3. Brett Harrison

    Brett Harrison Active Member

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    I'd say that's just down to your dancing ability. Practice all the time, even when you're just walking around. Try never hitting your heel right down to the ground (makes for silly looking walking/running). Make sure there's lots of boom range and elasticity in your arms at all times and have them react to your every movement.
     
  4. Paul Hill

    Paul Hill New Member

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    Hi, yep it is the up and down movement. The rig has the 5d Mk3/16-35 and dp4 monitor, so weight is pretty good. Prior to use the balance setup is good, so I'm a bit confused why I'm getting this issue. But thank you for taking the time to give me your advice. Kind regards Paul
     
  5. Paul Hill

    Paul Hill New Member

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    Hi Brett, good advice which I will try. When you say boom range do you mean holding the rig further away from my body ?

    Paul
     
  6. Curtis Huisman

    Curtis Huisman New Member

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    I know people will probably make comments about this being bad for your back etc, but one thing i've noticed is to just let go of your posture. Allow your back to hunch over a bit and your shoulders to roll forward, this should absorb the impact of walking like a spring versus standing up straight.
     
  7. William Bartlett

    William Bartlett New Member

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    There's no 4th axis to control up and down movements. Just like walking with a glidecam, you need to practice, practice, practice!

    Using a steadicam vest and arm will definitely help though. It will also save your back a lot of strain. 10-15lbs is a lot to carry at arms length if you've got a long take to do. Fortunately, the Movi does a great job at eliminating the shake your arms will get near the end of a long take haha
     
  8. Nicolas Teeuwen

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    In the fall of last year I was going from one shoot to another and decided to film whilst running down the street. I was holding the camera in only one arm. The vertical movement of the camera seems quite minimal and pretty good considering I was more focused on running and only holding the camera in one arm.

     
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  9. Chris Monberg

    Chris Monberg New Member

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    Hey Nick,
    Yours Looks pretty Smooth. I'm having the same up and down movement as paul. What are you settings on the movie? I did auto tune @70% as recommended on the movie site.... Any help would be great. maybe its just practice....
    Thanks
    Chris.
     
  10. Chris Monberg

    Chris Monberg New Member

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    Hey Paul
    I just got mine and I'm having the same up and down movement..... I did auto tune @70% as recommended on the movie site.... Any help would be great.?? maybe its just practice....
    Thanks
    Chris.
     
  11. Nicolas Teeuwen

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    I never use the Autotune. I actually rarely change the numbers as the configuration I use changes only slighty. I use it with both the 16-35 and 24-70 on a 5D MK III. I tried Autotune once, when it was first made available, but I had already tuned it manually and the numbers I pushed it towards were much higher then what Autotune got. I followed the recommendation of turning each # up until it vibrates. I then pick up the Movi and move it around and then adjust if anything oscillates again.

    I possibly benefit from a few things.
    1. I used to use a Steadicam (Actually blackbird stablizer but same idea). I had to learn how to move with that.
    2. I have been tap dancing for over 20 years. You have to learn how to move your legs and feet and keep your torso from up and down movement. If your whole body moves too much it just slows you down.
    That said, I was running when I did this shot, an I was not really paying attention to how I moved. I wasn't even looking at the video monitor. I was also shooting full frame at 16mm which possibly helps too.
    I would start with the Autotune settings and then bump them up until each axis starts vibrating. You might not have those #'s as high as you could.
     

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