ATA Carnet.

Discussion in 'CineStar FAQ - Tips and Tricks' started by Darren Brower, Dec 18, 2013.

  1. Darren Brower

    Darren Brower Member

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    Hi Guys,

    I was just offered a job filming aerials for an American show down in Argentina. Do you Guys thing i need to add my gear to the productions ATA Carne't? has anyone done this. The show will provide us with work permits and all paperwork. All other production gear will enter on a Carne't, However, is a Cinestar without serial numbers considered professional camera equipment ? It does to me, But.......
     
  2. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Would it be worth getting an official looking label printed with a serial number for the CS8, sticking it to the hub-plate (or battery plate) and then adding it to the Carnet? What's the down-side of so doing?

    Andy.
     
  3. Darren Brower

    Darren Brower Member

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    Hi Andy,
    I don't think it will harm anything, im just wandering if it is necessary? I guess its like adding a 5D or other camera to a Carne't, I wouldn't ordinarily do it. I travel alot with another well known show as a sound mixer, and a actually do the carne't in each country we fly to/from, however it usually only lists the professional camera and sound equipment.
    The CS8 is kind of stuck in the middle i think.
     
  4. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Darren you want to go the Carne't for all of your equipment. That ensures that when you come home and the lists match you won't be potentially charged any customs fees. Pain in the butt yes, potential dollars saved, priceless.
     
  5. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Darren:
    Customs agents know what a 5D is. A Cinestar looks, well, sinister. So I think it would best to have it on a Carnet and even have some sample images of it in flight, or a video clip on your iPhone/whatever so you can reassure the aforementioned CBP dude that all is well.

    Remember: customs agent was the best job they could get. <evil grin>
    Seriously, though....they're folks that believe in what they're doing, take the job very seriously, and can, on a whim, make your life hell. We're talking confiscating computers and body cavity searches. And I don't mean the computer's body cavity.

    Why mess around? Make their job easier... :)

    Andy.
     
  6. Jose Luis Ocejo

    Jose Luis Ocejo Active Member

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    HI Darren if you get a ATA Carnet great, it will help you on your way back to the US, but I would also declare the gear at the customs window at the international US airport before you leave, that paper with a general list of your gear and with the serial numbers of what has serial numbers, many times has has help me with the customs officials of the country I am traveling too, it validates a little more that you are not selling your gear at the country you are going but every country is different I know Argentina is a Pain in the .....
    Im sure your Argentina producers will arrange for their customs passage
     
  7. Shaun Stanton

    Shaun Stanton Active Member

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    I would google Argentina's port of entry restrictions to quantify what you need. Each country spells out what is required in order to gain access with equipment. I would contact US customs at one of our port of entry's to clarify what they want on return. Refrain from using terms such as UAV drone, sUAS, UAS or anything thgat sounds like something other than a RC hobby aircraft. These things are covered under ITAR, or international trafficking of arms restrictions. I would refer to everything as camera or video production equipment.

    Keep in mind that some countries charge a fee if you are rendering service for payment in that country. Obviously you have a gray area because the payment is probably being made in the US, but work rendered is in the hoist country. I would research the rules.

    Google something called the foreign clearance guide, its provided by our state department and should give you the rules for entrance into other countries.

    I have a little bit of background in this by being a global reach transport pilot flying cargo all over the world.

    Shaun
     

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