Are Ec5 plugs the best?

Discussion in 'Electronics' started by Jason Herring, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. Jason Herring

    Jason Herring Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    12
    I have been using deans with great luck for my 4s system, now going to a 6s and want to know what you guys use?
     
  2. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    10,354
    Likes Received:
    1,160
    Jason:
    I'd recommend using EC5 connectors. Progressive RC carry them and also have made up cables. progressiverc.com.

    Andy.
     
  3. Jason Herring

    Jason Herring Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    12
    Thanks so much Andy, i was looking at the packs and the wire is 8 AWG, Will a ec5 work with that size wire?
     
  4. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    10,354
    Likes Received:
    1,160
    According to Mrs. Google, 8 AWG is 3.264 mm in diameter. I just measured the EC5 connectors I got from Progressive and the solder cups are 4.77 mm in diameter.

    So, as we say in the software business, "it should work." :rolleyes: (Note: we normally add, faintly, "...because I only changed one thing.")

    Andy.
     
  5. Jason Herring

    Jason Herring Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    12
    What type of iron do you use to heat up that type of wire ? A flamethrower :)
     
  6. Steve Maller

    Steve Maller UAV Grief Counselor

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,979
    Likes Received:
    807
    I use a Hakko set to 825°F with a broad chisel tip and it works fine. I used a lesser iron on some of my earlier attempts, and fortunately they failed in pretty mundane situations (like when removing the batteries from the copter after a flight). Ever since I started using the Hakko, I've been...luckier, I guess you could say.
     
  7. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    10,354
    Likes Received:
    1,160
    I also use the Hakko. I also have a small block of wood with two holes in it -- one fits the male connector, the other the female -- and holds them solder-cup upwards.

    I tin the 8-10 gauge wire ends pretty well (twist them if necessary before you tin them so that they form of cohesive bundle). I use a "third hand" to position the tinned end vertically above the solder cup -- and then twist the base of the third hand to give me access to the solder cup while making it easy to swivel the wire back when I'm ready to dunk it into the solder cup.

    With the Hakko chisel tip, I insert the tip in the small hole in the side of the solder cup and count slowly to about 25 seconds, then feed solder in to the cup to fill it about half way.

    Then I position the third hand so that the tinned end of the wire is dunked into the solder cup and into the molten solder. This shock-cools the solder in the cup down below its eutectic temperature (it solidifies!), so I keep the chisel tip against the side of the solder cup and offer up some more solder into the cup (the wire's insulation usually still gives you access to the top inner part of the solder cup). When the solder comes back above it's eutectic point (and melts) again, I feed in enough solder to just (and only just) fill the solder cup.

    Then I carefully disengage the Hakko the chisel tip from the side of the connector and let the connector and wire cool down for about 30 seconds. At that point, while the connector is still "toasty" (technical term), and using pliers because the connector is still hot (as I've learned), then I'll offer up the connector to the plastic housing, and press it home using a small electrical screwdriver on an exposed horizontal edge of the solder cup. It's easier to insert the connector into the housing when it's "toasty."

    Note: You only get one shot at inserting the connector -- you cannot remove them. So double check that you're putting the red wire into the right hole in the plastic housing, otherwise you'll end up with several more connectors than housings. Ask me how I know. :rolleyes:

    Andy.
     
  8. Gary McCready

    Gary McCready Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    42
    A local electrical engineer works for a company that makes wiring harnesses, for US fighter jets, and "connectors" are his area of expertise. He told me they only use crimp connectors, and that is also the type used on the Space shuttle. He recommended Power Poles, and I've been using them for two years without a failure. I had a "factory soldered" connector, to a battery come loose, twice. Never once had a problem with the PP!

    " the connectors tested, faired as well or better than the # 10 gauge wire itself."
     
  9. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Messages:
    5,211
    Likes Received:
    460
    Another method, think I got this from Jeff or Cedar. Take a small board and drill holes that will hold the ECC5 Connector, tip down. Use the third hand to tin all of the ends. Like Andy I use a Hakko and small tip in the side hole. Put the ECC5 into the hole in the board, Hakko tip in the hole. Wait a few seconds and add solder. Once you have a nice amount take the wire and insert it while slowly removing the soldering tip from the hole. Wait until the joint starts to harden. While the connector is still warm insert it into the plastic housing.

    The wood hole jig doesn't suck away heat like a vice or third hand.

    So as not to smash the end of the housing put the male/female together without and pins in place so that your are pressing on the back end of the body of the second one. Eliminates destroying the front end of the connector you are doing the insertion into. Doing this while warm makes them go in a lot easier.

    Do double, triple and quadruple check that you are inserting the positive red wire into the positive hole on the connector. They can not be removed without destroying the ECC5 plastic housing. Been there and done that....
     
  10. Michael McVay

    Michael McVay Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2012
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    91
    This is a pretty decent little item to make things easier as well:

    http://www.progressiverc.com/progressiverc-soldering-stand.html?

    It holds the bullets really well and if you still use deans plugs or anything else it holds those on the side - plus has the 3rd hand built in.

    I think there are some other similar products like this out there as well.
     
  11. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    10,354
    Likes Received:
    1,160

Share This Page