14.8V Li-Po Battery Recovery

Discussion in 'Batteries & Power' started by Dijon Herron, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. Dijon Herron

    Dijon Herron New Member

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    Hello! Has anyone had any luck recovering a Freefly Li-po battery? I've had a few of mine overdischarge down to 6.0V and I am unable to charge them back up. 1s and charge status just flash back n' forth.
     
  2. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Hi -- welcome to the forum.

    If it's not too much trouble, would you be kind enough to change your user name to your real first name and last name, please? The reasons for this (and how to do it) are explained here: http://forum.freeflysystems.com/index.php?threads/real-names.497/
    Thanks
    Andy

    Forensic Software & sUAV / Drone Analyst : Photographer : Videographer : Pilot (Portland, Oregon, USA): Trees=2, Ground=1, Props=11. :(
    The Ground Is The Limit™
    ---------- Forensic Drone Analyst : Forensic sUAV Analyst : Forensic Unmanned Aircraft Analyst : Forensic Drone Expert
     
  3. Gary Haynes

    Gary Haynes Administrator
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    Dijon at 6v static they are gone, gone, gone..... Not likely to recover.
     
  4. Dijon Herron

    Dijon Herron New Member

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    Thanks, but that is unfortunate. follow up question; could 9v or 10v be saved?
     
  5. Andy Johnson-Laird

    Andy Johnson-Laird Administrator
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    Dijon: The easiest answer to your question (and forgive me for not wanting to type too much!) is to do a Google search for:

    recovering an overdischarged lipo​

    Smart chargers can often be fooled into charging a LiPo as though they were Nickel Mercury (NiMh) just to get the battery voltage to come up to the point where they can then be charged as a LiPo, but while you're doing this, plan on standing on guard as you do this -- it is dangerous to walk away while you do this because (as you may already know), any time you do anything suspect to a LiPo, you're likely to be told something that ends with "...and there's a risk the LiPo will burst into flames."

    So you might try charging the LiPo as a NiMh for, meh, say, 20 minutes, then disconnect it and measure the voltage of the individual cells and see whether they are all above around 3.1 volts -- if so, then you can stop lying to the charger and charge it as a LiPo.

    But, as Gary says, if an individual cell in the LiPo has dropped below 3 volts, it's more likely to be a paperweight than a battery.

    I make the inference you have (a) a smart charger and (b) a LiPo tester like this.

    Hope this helps
    Andy

    Forensic Software & sUAV / Drone Analyst : Photographer : Videographer : Pilot (Portland, Oregon, USA): Trees=2, Ground=1, Props=11. :(
    The Ground Is The Limit™
    ---------- Forensic Drone Analyst : Forensic sUAV Analyst : Forensic Unmanned Aircraft Analyst : Forensic Drone Expert
     

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